functional nutrition & integrative health center
Dr. John Heary
Certified Functional Medicine & Nutrition
Certified Clinician Whole Food Nutrition
266 Buffalo St., Hamburg, NY 14075
(716) 545-4090
Inside You Will Learn...
Thyroid disorders are very common in the U.S. and they continue to increase every year.

Thyroid medications (hormones) especially Synthroid have been on the top 10 most prescribed meds for decades.

Most thyroid conditions are not diagnosed in the early stages.

Every cell in the body has receptor sites for thyroid hormones.

If you lack ideal thyroid hormone levels this can lead to a decline in cellular function in all of your body systems.

This is also why symptoms can be so varied when you have a dysfunctional thyroid.

The longer that you have a thyroid condition can lead to more loss of function and quality of life.

The most common causes of thyroid dysfunction include hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, goiter (an enlarged thryoid) and thyroid cancer.

It's estimated by the American Thyroid Association that over 20 million Americans are affected by thyroid disorders.

The thyroid gland is very susceptible and sensitive to imbalances in physiological systems of the body.

It's also one of the most common sites for autoimmune disease.

If you have an autoimmune hypothyroid it is known as Hashimoto's Disease.

If you have an autoimmune hyperthyroid it is known as Graves Disease.

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis is considered the most common autoimmune disease in the United States.

Hashimoto's has also been found to be the cause of hypothyroidism in 90% of the cases in the United States.

There has been extensive research done on thyroid conditions and autoimmune thyroids. One study found that 7-8% of people in the United States have antibodies against their thyroid.

Thyroid antibodies have been found to be a marker for future thyroid disease.

Unfortunately many people have their thyroid destroyed year after year until they have lost enough thyroid tissue to be classified as hypothyroid.

Their symptoms tend to get worse as the thyroid is progressively destroyed.

Their metabolic rate decreases which often times leads to weight gain, fatigue, depression, brain fog, and gastrointestinal disorders.

What's even more disheartening is that their treatment will often be relegated to only thyroid hormone replacement.

And unfortunately their condition tends to worsen because nothing is done for their autoimmune condition.

Many thyroid sufferers have weakened immune systems even if they don't suffer from an autoimmune condition. And vice versa chronic immune conditions can disrupt thyroid physiology.

Some of these include hepatitis C, Epstein Barr Virus, Lyme disease, inflammatory bowel conditions, and autoimmune diseases.

It is super important to support and restore the immune system back to normal activity in order to stop the progression of thyroid disease.

There are many other causes for thyroid dysfunction. Some of the most common causes include nutritional deficiencies, hormone imbalances often caused by birth control pills and HRT (hormone replacement therapy).

Other causes include environmental disruptors which can act as goitrogens. These are substances that interfere with thyroid physiology.

One nutrient that is important to the thyroid is iodine. Iodine is needed by the thyroid to make thyroid hormones. Environmental disruptors such as mercury, arsenic, nitrates, pesticides, etc. compete with iodine preventing the thyroid from making thyroid hormone leading to a hypothyroid.

One more cause of hypothyroidism that I'll briefly mention are medications. There are many medications that can disrupt thyroid physiology.

Some of the most common ones include anti-inflammatory meds, antibiotics, anti-depressants, diabetic drugs, high blood pressure meds, pain meds, antacids, and cholesterol lowering drugs.

Many of these drugs may not necessarily have a direct effect on TSH but they may effect the thyroid pathway upstream or downstream.

In functional medicine and functional nutrition I am always looking for the root cause of the disease. It's my job to find out where the dysfunction is taking place.
Once you find out where the problem is then you can put a plan in place to fix the problem, and start feeling better and regain your health.

“I am off all of my medication. 
 I have more energy than I have in years. 
 Dr. John helped me to reverse my Hashimoto’s Thyroid condition.”  
Janine Murray
Dr. John Heary is a board certified chiropractic physician with over 600 hours of post graduate training in clinical nutrition and functional medicine. He graduated from the prestigious New York Chiropractic College. He is Certified in Functional Medicine and Nutrition. He is also a Certified Clinician in Whole Food Nutrition.

His true passion is helping patients achieve their optimal health potential through proper nutrition, supplementation, and lifestyle changes. He specializes in comprehensive blood testing. Thousands of people all over the country have reached a more optimal state of health because of his unique approach to finding the underlying cause of health problems.
Greenspace Access and Dementia.

Using data from the Healthy Brain Project, researchers observed that greater access to green spaces is associated with a reduced risk for dementia for residents of socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhoods. The findings suggest that measures to make parks and natural spaces easier to access could reduce the incidence of dementia in less affluent areas.

Preventative Medicine Reports, March 2024
Even Minimal Secondhand Smoke Exposure Linked to Higher A-Fib Risk.

Atrial fibrillation (A-Fib) is a common heart rhythm disorder that can lead to stroke, heart failure, and other cardiovascular complications. An analysis of data from the UK Biobank study found secondhand smoke exposure for an average of 2.2 hours a week raises the risk for A-Fib in the next decade by 6%.

European Society of Cardiology, April 2024
Healthy Diet Can Aid in Stress Management.

The Mediterranean diet is an eating pattern focused on fruit, vegetables, nuts, fish, olive oil, and whole grains while avoiding red and processed meats, dairy, saturated fats, and refined sugars. A study that looked at data from the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study found that greater adherence to the Mediterranean diet pattern is associated with greater resilience to stress among middle-aged and older adults.

Nutrition Research and Practice, April 2024
IBS Linked to Pregnancy-Related Mood Disorders.

An analysis of data concerning more than one million women collected during pregnancy found that those with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) had triple the risk for depression and anxiety when compared with soon-to-be moms without a history of IBS.

Neurogastroenterology and Motility, April 2024
Childhood Obesity Linked to Adult High Blood Pressure.

Following an analysis of data from multiple cohort studies, researchers report that each one-unit increase above the average body mass index (BMI) during childhood and adolescence is associated with a .96-1.30 mmHg increase in systolic blood pressure and a .53-.77 mmHg increase in diastolic blood pressure at midlife. The findings suggest that steps to curb obesity in childhood can provide life-long benefits.

European Association for the Study of Obesity, March 2024
Migraines May Be Risk Factor for Stroke in Young Adults.

Following an analysis of health insurance claims data, University of Colorado School of Medicine researchers report that migraines may be an important non-traditional risk factor for stroke in adults under the age of 34, even more so than traditional risk factors like high blood pressure.

Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, March 2024
Nighttime Light Pollution Can Raise Stroke Risk.

According to a new study, frequent exposure to bright outdoor lights during the night can negatively affect blood flow to the brain, increasing the risk for blood vessel disease— including stroke—by up to 43%.

Stroke, March 2024
Depression Can Speed Gastric Cancer Progression.

New research suggests that depression can stimulate a series of processes in the body that contribute to gastric cancer progression. Unfortunately, the current data indicates that depression affects up to 57% of gastric cancer patients.

World Journal of Gastroenterology, March 2024
Symptoms Linked to Increased Cardiovascular Risks in Menopausal Women.

According to a recent study, the combination of migraine and vasomotor symptoms (night sweats or hot flashes, for example) is linked to a more than 50% increased risk for either heart attack or stroke in women undergoing menopause.

Menopause Society, February 2024
Essential Tremor Linked to Higher Dementia Risk.

Essential tremor is a neurological disorder characterized by involuntary, rhythmic shaking of one or more body parts during voluntary movement or while maintaining a static posture. A study that monitored 222 essential tremor patients found such individuals may be up to three times more likely to develop dementia.

HealthDay, March 2024
Alcohol-Related Deaths Have Surged.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that alcohol use is associated with nearly 180,000 deaths each year in the United States, and this total has risen 29% since 2016. While various factors have contributed to this increase, researchers point to a rise in binge drinking among middle-aged adults.

Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, February 2024
Mediterranean Diet May Reduce Alzheimer’s Risk.

The Mediterranean diet is an eating pattern focused on fruit, vegetables, nuts, fish, olive oil, and whole grains while avoiding red and processed meats, dairy, saturated fats, and refined sugars. A systematic review that included 21 studies revealed an association between greater adherence to the Mediterranean diet and up to a 27% reduced risk for Alzheimer's disease.

Aging Clinical and Experimental Research, March 2024
Early-Life Diet May Set the Stage for Obesity in Adulthood.

Using data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, which monitored more than 15,000 individuals from birth until age 24, researchers found that unhealthy eating habits early in life—high intake of sugar sweetened beverages, fried food, and total calories coupled with a low intake of fruit and vegetables—are associated with a greater risk for obesity in early adulthood.

European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, March 2024
Teens Who Look at Food Labels Make Healthier Choices.

A recent experiment involving middle- and high-school students found that participants who frequently refer to Nutrition Facts labels on food items are more likely to choose more nutritious options and avoid unhealthy fare. Because they observed only 11% of students regularly examine food labeling, the authors of the study note there is an opportunity to better educate teens on healthy eating practices, which can offer lifelong health benefits.

Nutrients, January 2024
Irregular Sleep Pattern Can Affect Health During Midlife.

According to a recent study, middle-aged adults who don’t maintain a consistent sleep schedule from night to night are more likely to develop poor metabolic and cardiovascular health than their peers who go to bed around the same time.

Journal of Activity, Sedentary and Sleep Behaviors, January 2024
Neighborhood Fitness Spaces Benefit Post-Stroke Recovery.

Among a group of 333 mild-stroke survivors in New York City, researchers observed that those residing in neighborhoods with more fitness resources were 57% more likely to increase their physical activity levels, which can benefit their recovery.

American Heart Association, February 2024
Vegan Diet and Iodine Deficiency?

University of Nottingham researchers warn that nearly 4 in 5 individuals who switch to a vegan diet experience a reduced intake of iodine, with 1 in 5 experiencing severe reductions in the essential trace element. The research team adds that calcium and vitamin B12 intake is often lower in vegans, and individuals adopting such a diet should pay close attention to their nutrient intake.

Scientific Reports, January 2024
Get Enough Vitamin D This Winter.

To help maintain healthy vitamin D status during the winter, the Baylor College of Medicine recommends spending 15 to 30 minutes in direct sunlight during peak hours each day, eating vitamin D-rich foods, and taking a vitamin D supplement, if necessary.

Baylor College of Medicine, January 2024
Female Reproductive History May Affect COPD Risk.

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic lung disease that makes breathing difficult, and it is a leading cause of death in the United States. An analysis of data concerning more than 280,000 women revealed that the following reproductive factors are associated with an elevated risk for COPD later in life: first period before age 11; three or more children; multiple miscarriages; stillbirth; and menopause before age 51.

Thorax, February 2024
More Omega-3s Can Help Cut Colon Cancer Risk.
Using data from the IROPICAN study, researchers report that consuming a high ratio of omega-6 fatty acids (from vegetable oils, for example) to omega-3 fatty acids (from fish, for example) is associated with an elevated risk for colorectal cancer.

Lipids, January 2024
Diet and Breast Cancer Survival.

A meta-analysis of 22 observational studies found that a high intake of isoflavones, lignans, cruciferous vegetables, and green tea may reduce the risk of breast cancer-related mortality and recurrence.

JNCI Cancer Spectrum, December 2023
Phthalates May Lower Fertility.

Phthalates are a class of chemicals used to increase the durability of many materials, including some cosmetics and plastics. These chemicals are known as endocrine disruptors, which can influence hormone levels in the body. In a recent study that included more than 1,200 women attempting to conceive, researchers observed that those with higher levels of phthalates in their blood were up to 18% less likely to become pregnant.

Environmental Health Perspectives, December 2023
Depression Linked to Insomnia.

Among a group of 1,200 adults who were monitored for one year, researchers observed an association between depressive symptoms and future insomnia. The findings suggest that doctors should screen sleep disorder patients for depression.

Journal of Clinical Psychology, February 2024
Is an Inflammatory Diet Linked to Stroke?

Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, researchers report that a pro-inflammatory diet—an eating pattern characterized by a high intake of sugar, polysaturated vegetable oils, trans fats, dairy products, feed lot-raised meat, red meat, processed meat, alcohol, refined grains, and artificial food additives—is associated with up to an 87% elevated risk for stroke.

BMC Public Health, January 2024
Cooking Tips for Healthier Cholesterol Levels.

The Mayo Clinic recommends cooking with fats like olive oil and avocado oil, which do not raise low-density lipoprotein (the “bad” cholesterol) levels. Other cooking strategies to aid in healthier blood lipid levels include avoiding saturated fats, opting for lean proteins, limiting processed foods, and eating more omega-3 fatty acid-rich foods.

Mayo Clinic, December 2023
Two Risk Factors for Premature Heart Attack and Stroke in Women.

According to a study that looked at long-term population data from Denmark, women with a history of both migraines and gestational hypertension are nearly three times more likely to experience a major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular event before age 60.

Neurology, January 2024
Is Combustion Pollution Linked to Parkinson’s Disease?

Following a review of data from the Sister Study, which included more than 48,000 women, researchers observed that increased exposure to nitrogen dioxide—a component of combustion exhaust—may be associated with an elevated risk for Parkinson’s disease.

Environmental Health Perspectives, January 2024
Sleep Problems During/Post Menopause Linked to Cardiovascular Risks.

Compared with premenopausal women, perimenopausal and postmenopausal women with either poor sleep quality, insomnia, or sleep apnea may be at increased risk for poor cardiovascular health, including heart attack and stroke. The findings suggest that doctors should screen women during one of these stages of menopause for sleep troubles.

American Heart Association, November 2023
Fruit and Veggies Lower Risk for Some Cancers.

Following an analysis of findings from 72 studies, researchers report that a high intake of fruit and vegetables is linked to a reduced risk for several cancers including gastric, colorectal, and breast cancers, which account for more than 100,000 deaths in the United States each year.

Epidemiology and Health, November 2023
Weak Grip and Low Vitamin D Raise Mortality Risk.

Handgrip strength is a tool used by researchers to estimate an individual’s overall fitness level. Among a group of 2,635 older adults, researchers observed those with a weak grip accompanied by low vitamin D status were 2.18 times more likely to die in the following twelve years.

Public Health, December 2023
Vitamin D and Winter.

During the colder and darker months, it can be harder for individuals to spend enough time in the sun to maintain healthy vitamin D levels. If your levels are suboptimal, your healthcare may recommend dietary changes to incorporate more vitamin D-rich foods and/or taking a vitamin D supplement during this time of year.

Baylor College of Medicine, November 2023
Healthy Fats and Chronic Abdominal and Pelvic Pain.

According to a recent study, a higher intake of omega-3 fatty acids—which are known to provide anti-inflammatory benefits—is associated with a reduced risk for chronic abdominal and pelvic pain.

Frontiers in Nutrition, September 2023
Ketogenic Diet and Polycystic Kidney Disease.

The ketogenic diet triggers ketosis, which is a metabolic process that breaks down fats and proteins and transforms them into energy for the body. Among a group of 66 hereditary polycystic kidney disease patients, 95% of those who switched to the ketogenic diet were able to stick to the diet, which led to positive improvements in kidney function.

Cell Reports Medicine, November 2023
Modifiable Risk Factors for Degenerative Disk Disease.

Disks degenerate when they become dehydrated, lose height, and the vertebrae on either side develop bony growths called osteophytes, which can cause or exacerbate lower back pain. A systematic review that included 111 studies identified several modifiable risk factors for degenerative disk disease, including being overweight/obese, hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, and smoking.

NeuroChirurgie, September 2023
Calcium Supplement May Reduce Risk for Several Pregnancy Complications.

Following an analysis of data from 26 studies, researchers report that expectant mothers who take a calcium supplement have a reduced risk for preeclampsia (44%), gestational hypertension (20%), preterm delivery (12%), induced labor (10%), low birth weight (10%), perinatal mortality (12%), and maternal mortality (52%).

Current Problems in Cardiology, November 2023
How Many Steps Do You Need Per Day to Lower Your Risk of Premature Death?

While the recommendation to walk 10,000 steps a day is believed to be the result of clever marketing, a recent analysis of data from twelve studies found that 8,000 steps a day significantly reduces the risk of premature death, and the benefits increase up to about 16,000 steps a day.

Journal of the American College of Cardiology, October 2023
Traumatic Childhood Linked to Worse Metabolic Health in Adulthood.

Assessments of 2,958 adults spread over the course of a decade revealed that those with a history of adverse childhood events—such as emotional, physical, and sexual abuse, and emotional and physical neglect—had worse metabolic heath over time, particularly in the domains of waist circumference, blood glucose levels, overall fitness, blood pressure, and cholesterol readings.

Psychological Medicine, November 2023
Mediterranean Diet Helps Burns Fat While Adding Muscle.

The Mediterranean diet is an eating pattern focused on fruit, vegetables, nuts, fish, olive oil, and whole grains while avoiding red and processed meats, dairy, saturated fats, and refined sugars. In a study that included more than 1,500 overweight/obese middle-aged and older adults, researchers observed that those who reduced their caloric intake by 30%, closely adhered to the Mediterranean diet, and increased their physical activity levels were most likely to gain lean muscle mass while reducing total fat and belly fat levels.

JAMA Network Open, October 2023
California Bans Four Additives in Food.

The state of California has banned four food additives— red dye No. 3, potassium bromate, brominated vegetable oil, and propylparaben—that while approved by the Food and Drug Administration, have already been banned in the European Union and elsewhere due to potentially harmful effects to the respiratory, nervous, and reproductive systems. According to lawmakers, the ban goes into effect in 2027, giving food manufacturers time to adjust their recipes and formulations.

NBC News, October 2023
Personalized Coaching Helps During Early-Stages of Alzheimer's Disease.

The Institute for Systems Biology reports that adding personalized lifestyle coaching—dietary recommendations, physical activity, cognitive training, and sleep and stress management—to standard treatment during the initial stages of Alzheimer's disease can lead to improved cognitive performance.

Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, October 2023
Smog Can Increase Short-Term Risk for Stroke.

A recent study found that acute exposure to high levels of smog can increase the risk for stroke in older adults in the following week by up to 28%. It’s advised that at-risk individuals monitor indoor air quality, limit outdoor activities, and use an N95 mask if they must spend extended time outdoors on smoggy days.

Neurology, September 2023
Early Signs of Multiple Sclerosis?

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous system in which the immune system attacks the brain and spinal cord resulting in symptoms such as numbness, tingling, mood changes, memory problems, pain, fatigue, blindness, and paralysis. An analysis of the health records of more than 6,800 multiple sclerosis (MS) patients revealed the following conditions often occur at an elevated rate in the year before MS onset: depression, anxiety, fatigue, sleep disorders, irritable bowel syndrome, anemia, and pain. Researchers hope this data can be used in the earlier detection of MS.

Neurology, September 2023
Ginger May Benefit Patients with Autoimmune Diseases.

Autoimmune diseases can trigger an inflammatory response in the body, which can lead to pain, swelling, redness, and hot sensations. New research suggests that taking a ginger supplement can reduce inflammation in patients with certain autoimmune diseases, such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis. The researchers hope their findings will encourage discussions about incorporating ginger supplements into treatment plans for these conditions.

JCI Insight, September 2023
One-in-Three Adults Have Hypertension.

The World Health Organization reports that 1.3 billion people worldwide have high blood pressure, though up to half may be unaware of their condition. Experts note that improved screening and management of hypertension could prevent millions of early deaths and health complications in the next three decades.

World Health Organization, September 2023
Unhealthy Snacking Sabotages Healthy Meals.

New research suggests that people who eat a balanced diet may not consider the health quality of their snacks, which can have a negative effect on their blood sugar levels, increasing the risk for poor health outcomes. If simply avoiding snacks between meals is not possible, experts recommend switching to healthier options like fruit and nuts.

European Journal of Nutrition, September 2023
Study Links Higher BMI to Low Back Pain.

Body mass index (BMI) is an estimate of body fat based on weight and height and is commonly used to categorize an individual’s weight status as underweight, normal weight, overweight, or obese. An analysis of data concerning more than 600,000 young adults revealed an association between a higher BMI and up to a 13% increased risk for low back pain.

American Journal of Epidemiology, August 2023
Walk After Eating.

Experts from HCA Florida Healthcare note that walking after eating offers the following benefits: helps regulate blood sugar levels; aids digestion by stimulating the stomach and intestines, potentially reducing bloating; lowers blood pressure, particularly diastolic blood pressure, which is crucial for heart health; contributes to weight loss by burning calories and boosting metabolism; has a positive impact on mood by reducing stress hormones and increasing happiness-inducing hormones like endorphins and oxytocin.

HCA Florida Healthcare, September 2023
Two More Benefits of the Mediterranean Diet.

The Mediterranean diet is an eating pattern focused on fruits, vegetables, nuts, fish, olive oil, and whole grains while avoiding red and processed meats, dairy, saturated fats, and refined sugars. A study that included 3,386 participants found that greater adherence to the Mediterranean diet is associated with healthier fasting glucose levels and a reduced risk for central obesity.

Scientific Reports, September 2023
Paper Straws May Contain Harmful Chemicals.

Perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are chemicals used to imbue heat-, oil-, stain-, grease-, and water-resistant properties to products such as food containers, clothes, and furniture and have been linked to several poor health outcomes. University of Antwerp researchers tested 39 eco-friendly paper straw brands and found that 27 contained PFAS. While occasional use of such products may pose limited risks, these forever chemicals can accumulate in the body and in the environment, potentially becoming a greater concern over time.

Food Additives and Contaminants, August 2023
Mediterranean Lifestyle May Promote Longevity.

Using data from the UK Biobank study, researchers report that individuals who most closely adhere to the Mediterranean lifestyle—eating the Mediterranean diet in combination with regular exercise, adequate sleep, and an active social life—may have up to a 29% lower risk for early death than their peers with a less healthy lifestyle pattern.

Mayo Clinic Proceedings, August 2023
Sugary Drinks May Raise Alzheimer's Risk.

An analysis of data concerning more than 200,000 middle-aged and older adults revealed that consuming two or more servings of sugary beverages a day is associated with an elevated risk for Alzheimer's disease diagnosis during a ten-year period.

GeroScience, August 2023
Pain and Depression…

Based on an analysis of genetic data, researchers report there is a bi-directional relationship between depression and neck/shoulder pain, back pain, stomach/abdominal pain, and headache. The research team concludes, “Our results enhance the understanding of the complex interplay between pain and mental health and highlight the importance of a holistic approach to pain management that addresses both physical and psychological factors.”

Journal of Headache and Pain, July 2023
Artificial Sweeteners May Increase Body Fat.

University of Minnesota Medical School and School of Public Health researchers report that the long-term intake of the artificial sweeteners aspartame and saccharin is associated with increased volumes of fat in the abdomen and muscles. The finding challenges recommendations to replace added sugars with artificial sweeteners.

International Journal of Obesity, July 2023
Yoga May Be as Effective as Stabilization Exercise for Chronic Low Back Pain.

Stabilization exercises are often recommended for patients under treatment for chronic low back pain; however, a patient may not enjoy the process, which can reduce their odds for adherence. A recent study found that yoga may serve as a viable alternative to stabilization exercises for improving pain, function, metabolic capacity, and sleep quality in patients with chronic low back pain.

Holistic Nursing Practice, July 2023
Diagnostic Errors Harm Nearly 800,000 Americans Each Year.

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report that approximately 795,000 Americans die or are permanently disabled each year due to diagnostic errors that result in either delayed or unnecessary treatment, most commonly vascular events, infections, and cancers. Lead investigator Dr. Newman-Toker adds, “Diagnostic errors are, by a wide margin, the most under resourced public health crisis we face, yet research funding only recently reached the $20 million per year mark. If we are to achieve diagnostic excellence and the goal of zero preventable harm from diagnostic error, we must continue to invest in efforts to achieve success.”

BMJ Quality & Safety, July 2023
Autoimmune Conditions and Mood Disorders.

Questionnaires completed by more than 1,800 patients under treatment for an autoimmune disease revealed that more than half also suffer from anxiety or depression. However, many of these patients have not shared their mental health symptoms with their doctor. The researchers stress that healthcare providers should routinely inquire about their patients’ mental health as addressing their mental well-being may be crucial for achieving an optimal health outcome.

Rheumatology, July 2023
Women with Severe Stroke Less Likely to Be Sent to Stroke Centers.

New research indicates that women with severe large vessel occlusion acute ischemic stroke, which occurs when a major artery in the brain is blocked, are 9% less likely to be routed to a comprehensive stroke center for timely care. However, researchers are unsure why this is the case as female patients with this form of stroke have more severe symptoms and live a similar distance from comprehensive stroke centers as male stroke patients. The researchers add that improving prehospital routing and triage for women with severe stroke is crucial to ensuring timely and appropriate treatment.

Journal of the American Heart Association, July 2023
Low Iron Levels Common in Reproductive-Age Females.

According to a recent study, nearly 40% of women in the United States have insufficient iron levels, which can affect sleep, cognitive function, vitality, and mood. Experts note that iron levels can be assessed with a simple blood test and can be improved by eating a healthy diet that includes iron-rich foods, though an iron supplement may also be recommended for some women.

Journal of the American Medical Association, June 2023
Tap Water and Forever Chemicals…

Perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are chemicals used to imbue heat-, oil-, stain-, grease-, and water-resistant properties to products such as food containers, clothes, and furniture and have been linked to several poor health outcomes. Because these substances do not naturally break down in the environment, they’re known as “forever chemicals”. A study conducted by the United States Geological Survey found that nearly half (45%) of the tap water samples they collected tested positive for PFAS with the greatest concentrations in samples from the Great Plains, Great Lakes, Eastern Seaboard, and Central/Southern California. While government agencies work to mitigate this potential problem, individuals are encouraged to stay informed about local water quality and consider using carbon filters or reverse osmosis systems to filter their drinking water.

Environment International, July 2023
Heart-Healthy Diet Pattern.

Following an analysis of data concerning more than 245,000 adults from 80 countries, researchers report that a diet characterized by a high intake of fruit, vegetables, legumes, nuts, fish, and whole-fat dairy products is associated with a reduced risk for cardiovascular disease.

European Heart Journal, July 2023
Staying Fit Reduces a Man's Cancer Risk.

An analysis of data concerning nearly 178,000 men revealed that better performance on a stationary bike—a means to gauge cardiorespiratory fitness—at midlife is linked to a lower risk for both colon and lung cancer, as well as increased odds for surviving prostate, colon, and lung cancer.

JAMA Network Open, June 2023
Intermittent Fasting and Traditional Calorie Counting Both Aid Weight Loss.

Researchers assigned 90 obese adults to one of three groups: eating restricted to an eight-hour window each day; reducing total daily calorie intake by 25%; and no eating restrictions whatsoever. After one year, the research team observed that both time- and calorie-restricted eating provided similar weight loss benefits when compared with the control group.

Annals of Internal Medicine, June 2023
Hormone Replacement Therapy and Dementia.

Contrary to previous studies that did not establish a relationship between hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and cognitive risks, a recent study found that women who receive estrogen-progestin therapy to manage menopause symptoms may have up to a 24% increased risk for dementia. However, the authors of the study note that the study is observational in nature and cannot establish the relationship between HRT and potential cognitive decline.

BMJ, June 2023
Gum Disease and Cognitive Decline.

A systematic review that included eleven studies found that periodontal disease is associated with an elevated risk for cognitive impairment. The finding adds to a growing body of evidence that poor oral health is linked to increased risk for negative health outcomes elsewhere in the body.

Evidence-Based Dentistry, July 2023
Microbiome Changes May Explain Increase in Colon Cancer.

New research suggests that negative changes in the gut microbiome may partially explain the rise of colon cancer cases among younger adults. In particular, researchers point to the increased prevalence of bacteria like Fusobacterium nucleatum, which can suppress immune responses and facilitate tumor growth.

American Society of Clinical Oncology, May 2023
Is Vitamin D Linked to Blood Lipid Readings?

According to a recent study, improving vitamin D status in patients with hyperlipidemia can lead to significant improvements in triglyceride and total cholesterol levels. The findings suggest that doctors should assess the vitamin D serum levels in patients with abnormal blood lipid readings.

Endocrine Connections, July 2023
Flavanols May Have Role in Frailty Prevention.

Flavanols are compounds found in fruit and vegetables that can help prevent cellular damage by neutralizing free radicals. While protein intake is often emphasized to help older adults maintain their muscle mass, a recent study found that increasing one’s daily flavanol intake by 10 mg can reduce the risk for frailty by 20%.

American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, May 2023
Is Depression Linked with Sleep Apnea?

Using data from the 2020 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, researchers have identified a strong correlation between a high risk for obstructive sleep apnea and an elevated risk for major depressive disorder. The findings suggest that patients under treatment for one condition should be screened for the other as concurrent management may be necessary to achieve a successful outcome.

BMC Psychiatry, June 2023
Cardiovascular Risk Linked to Lower Cognitive Function.

According to a recent study, the higher an individual’s risk for cardiovascular disease, the greater their risk for poor cognitive function. The findings highlight the importance of taking steps to lower one’s risk for cardiovascular disease by maintaining a healthy weight, getting regular exercise, eating a healthy diet, managing stress, and avoiding smoking and excessive alcohol consumption.

Journal of the American Heart Association, May 2023
Flavanols Help Boost Memory.

Flavanols are compounds found in fruit, tea, and chocolate that can help prevent cellular damage by neutralizing free radicals. A recent study found that older individuals who took a daily flavanol supplement improved their scores on memory assessments by 11% within one year.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, May 2023
Are You Overtraining?

Because overtraining can result in an increased risk for joint and muscle injuries, the Mayo Clinic recommends watching out for the following warning signs: callous blistering, broken toenails, pain in the soles of the feet (indicating plantar fasciitis), and pain in the back of the ankles or front of the shins (shin splints). Individuals who experience these symptoms are advised to rest, reduce training intensity, or switch their routine. If such symptoms persist or worsen, it’s important to contact a healthcare provider to make sure a more serious issue is not present.

Mayo Clinic, May 2023
Smoking and Chronic Low Back Pain.

Examinations of 54 chronic low back pain patients revealed an association between cigarettes smoked per day and worse scores on assessments of pain intensity, fear-avoidance beliefs, and disability.

International Journal of Public Health, March 2023
Joining a Study May Stimulate Healthier Habits.

Among participants in the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986 study, researchers observed that those who agreed to join follow-up studies focused on diet, substance use, and physical activity had a slightly lower risk for cardiometabolic disorders than cohort members who abstained from additional studies.

Cardiology & Cardiovascular Disorders, March 2023
Obesity Increases Odds for Gastrointestinal Cancers.

An analysis of data concerning more than 131,000 adults whom researchers monitored for 13 years revealed that maintaining a healthy weight in adulthood is associated with a reduced risk for cancers of the gastrointestinal system, including colon cancer.

JAMA Network Open, May 2023
Watermelon Consumption Offers Heart Health Benefits.

Louisiana State University researchers note that watermelon contains L-citrulline and L-arginine, compounds that can modulate the effects of nitric oxide bioavailability and heart rate variability—which can benefit cardiovascular health.

Nutrients, November 2022
How Exercise Boosts Brain Health.

Researchers report that muscle contractions release compounds into the bloodstream that stimulate increased growth and activity of the neurons in the hippocampus, a part of the brain crucial for learning and memory.

Neuroscience, April 2023
Poor Sleep Linked to Worse Brain Health in Old Age.

Using data from the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936, researchers report that poor sleep is associated with faster loss of healthy white matter in the brain in the eighth decade of life.

Sleep Medicine, June 2023
Cancer Moonshot May Fall Short.

In 2016, the National Cancer Institute received funding to initiate the Cancer Moonshot, a program with the goal of cutting the cancer death rate by 50% in the next 25 years. While improvements in screening and treatment have led to an annual decline of 2.3% a year in recent years, the agency notes that the rate of decline will need to increase to 2.7% a year to meet the Cancer Moonshot goal.

Cancer Discovery, April 2023
Mediterranean Diet Improves Artery Flexibility.

According to a recent study, switching to the Mediterranean diet—an eating pattern focused on fruits, vegetables, nuts, fish, olive oil, and whole grains while avoiding red and processed meats, dairy, saturated fats, and refined sugars–can reduce proximal aortic stiffness by 4.8% within 18 months.

Journal of the American College of Cardiology, April 2023
Many Teens Have Considered Suicide.

A recent study found that 30% of high school students have seriously considered suicide, 23.6% have planned suicide, and 13.3% have attempted suicide. The authors of the study conclude, “School and community-based strategies include creating safe and supportive environments, promoting connectedness, teaching coping and problem solving, and gatekeeper training.”

Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, April 2023
STIs Continue to Increase in the United States.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that sexually transmitted infections (STIs) increased again in 2021— a total of 2.5 million cases in the year compared with 1.9 million in 2014—with the most notable increases in syphilis, gonorrhea, and chlamydia infections.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, April 2023
Many Kids Have Misused ADHD Medications.

New research suggests that as a higher percentage of students in a middle or high school is prescribed medication to manage attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), there is a corresponding increase in students who abuse such medications. In some schools, up to a quarter of students have taken ADHD medications that were prescribed to a peer. Health officials note that the misuse of such drugs can lead to side effects that include irregular heartbeat, dangerously high body temperature, seizures, and a greater risk for substance use disorder over time.

JAMA Network Open, April 2023
Sit Less, Move More, Live Longer.

Using data from the Attitude, Behavior, and Change cohort study, researchers report that middle-aged adults who maintain a healthy weight, minimize sedentary behaviors, and get regular exercise are about two-thirds less likely to die in the following 15 years than their overweight peers who seldom exercise and spend excessive amounts of time performing sedentary activities.

Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, May 2023
Modified Mediterranean Ketogenic Diet May Reduce Alzheimer's Risk.

Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is responsible for inhibiting the excitability of brain cells and balancing the neuronal activity required for healthy brain function. Past research has associated GABA dysfunction with neuropsychiatric conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. In a recent study, researchers observed that patients with mild-cognitive impairment experienced an increase in GABA-producing microbes in the gut after switching to a modified Mediterranean-ketogenic diet (low carb emphasizing healthy fats and proteins), which researchers suspect may lower the risk for progression to Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia.

Alzheimer's & Dementia, March 2023
Mediterranean Diet Benefits Eye Health.

The Mediterranean diet is an eating pattern focused on fruits, vegetables, nuts, fish, olive oil, and whole grains while avoiding red and processed meats, dairy, saturated fats, and refined sugars. The current research suggests that greater adherence to the Mediterranean diet is associated with slower progression of age-related macular degeneration and a reduced incidence of diabetic retinopathy.

Current Opinions in Ophthalmology, May 2023
Asthma and Eczema Increase Arthritis Risk.

Following a review of data concerning nearly 1.4 million adults, researchers report that individuals with either asthma or eczema are up to 58% more likely to develop osteoarthritis, and the risk is even greater for those with both conditions.

Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, March 2023
Irregular Sleep Associated with High Blood Pressure.

During the course of a nine-month study that included 12,287 adults, researchers observed that participants whose sleep duration varied by two or more hours from night to night were 85% more likely to have high blood pressure. The finding highlights the importance of maintaining a consistent sleep schedule.

American Heart Association, March 2023
Depression May Be Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease.

Among a group of 1,028 adults whom researchers monitored for more than five years, those with more severe anxiety and/or depressive symptoms were more likely to be diagnosed with cardiovascular disease, even after adjusting for traditional risk factors.

Journal of Affective Disorders, May 2023
Increasing Fiber Intake May Help Preserve Cognitive Function.

Past research has shown that carriers of the apolipoprotein E (ApoE) gene are at elevated risk for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease. In a recent study that included 1,139 older adults, researchers observed that participants with the ApoE gene who increased their fiber intake by 5 grams a day had a 30% lower risk for cognitive decline.

Age and Ageing, January 2023
Dangerous Fungal Infections on the Rise.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that drug-resistant Candida albicans infections have increased significantly since the first identified case in the United States in 2016 to 4,041 cases in 2021. While Candida albicans is not a danger to healthy people, infection is a threat to those who are very ill, patients with invasive medical devices, and those who have long or frequent hospital stays.

Annals of Internal Medicine, March 2023
Osteoporosis Linked to Macular Degeneration?

Osteoporosis is a condition characterized by low bone mineral density, which can increase the risk for fracture in the event of a fall. An analysis of data from the Taiwanese National Health Insurance system found that osteoporotic patients also have a 34% elevated risk for age-related macular degeneration. The findings suggest that patients under treatment for osteoporosis should be sure to attend regular vision screenings.

Osteoporosis International, April 2023
Foods to Avoid for Reducing Salt Intake.

The Institute for the Advancement of Food and Nutrition Sciences notes that the following foods may be most responsible for excessive sodium intake in the American diet: pizza; bread, rolls, and buns; cold cuts and cured meats; soups; burritos and tacos; savory snacks; poultry; cheese; pasta dishes; burgers; cookies, brownies, and cakes; bacon, frankfurters, and sausages; and chicken nuggets.

Nutrients, February 2023
Staying Active Can Slow Mental Decline.

Researchers analyzed long-term data from the Women's Health Initiative study and found that for about every half hour of moderate-to-vigorous activity a woman over age 65 averages per day, her risk for developing mild-cognitive impairment or dementia decreases by 21%.

Alzheimer's & Dementia, January 2023
Just 10 Minutes Longer for Improved Diet.

In a study that included 50 families, researchers observed that when mealtime was extended by ten minutes, children ate more servings of fruit and vegetables, and they felt more full and less likely to snack afterward.

JAMA Network Open, April 2023
Uterine Fibroid Symptoms.

While growths in a woman’s uterus called uterine fibroids usually aren’t cancerous, they can be a source of significant pain and discomfort. The Department of Health and Human Services notes the following are typical symptoms of uterine fibroids: heavy, painful periods; feelings of fullness in the lower abdomen/pelvic region; abdominal swelling; frequent urination; lower back pain; and reproductive issues.

Department of Health and Human Services, February 2023
Lifestyle Changes for Better Blood Pressure Management.

The Mayo Clinic offers the following natural recommendations for individuals to lower their blood pressure: lose weight, get regular exercise, reduce sodium intake, avoid excessive alcohol consumption, don’t smoke, learn to manage stress, get adequate sleep, monitor blood pressure at home, and let your family and friends know your goals so they can support your choices.

Mayo Clinic, February 2023
Dr. John Heary
Functional Nutrition & Integrative Health Center
266 Buffalo St.
Hamburg, NY 14075
(716) 545-4090
John Heary, DC, PC - Copyright 2019 - All Rights Reserved
Privacy Policy - Disclaimer - Terms of Service
functional nutrition & integrative health center
Dr. John Heary
Certified Functional Medicine & Nutrition
Certified Clinician Whole Food Nutrition
266 Buffalo St., Hamburg, NY 14075
(716) 545-4090
Inside You Will Learn...
Thyroid disorders are very common in the U.S. and they continue to increase every year.

Thyroid medications (hormones) especially Synthroid have been on the top 10 most prescribed meds for decades.

Most thyroid conditions are not diagnosed in the early stages.

Every cell in the body has receptor sites for thyroid hormones.

If you lack ideal thyroid hormone levels this can lead to a decline in cellular function in all of your body systems.

This is also why symptoms can be so varied when you have a dysfunctional thyroid.

The longer that you have a thyroid condition can lead to more loss of function and quality of life.

The most common causes of thyroid dysfunction include hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, goiter (an enlarged thryoid) and thyroid cancer.

It's estimated by the American Thyroid Association that over 20 million Americans are affected by thyroid disorders.

The thyroid gland is very susceptible and sensitive to imbalances in physiological systems of the body.

It's also one of the most common sites for autoimmune disease.

If you have an autoimmune hypothyroid it is known as Hashimoto's Disease.

If you have an autoimmune hyperthyroid it is known as Graves Disease.

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis is considered the most common autoimmune disease in the United States.

Hashimoto's has also been found to be the cause of hypothyroidism in 90% of the cases in the United States.

There has been extensive research done on thyroid conditions and autoimmune thyroids. One study found that 7-8% of people in the United States have antibodies against their thyroid.

Thyroid antibodies have been found to be a marker for future thyroid disease.

Unfortunately many people have their thyroid destroyed year after year until they have lost enough thyroid tissue to be classified as hypothyroid.

Their symptoms tend to get worse as the thyroid is progressively destroyed.

Their metabolic rate decreases which often times leads to weight gain, fatigue, depression, brain fog, and gastrointestinal disorders.

What's even more disheartening is that their treatment will often be relegated to only thyroid hormone replacement.

And unfortunately their condition tends to worsen because nothing is done for their autoimmune condition.

Many thyroid sufferers have weakened immune systems even if they don't suffer from an autoimmune condition. And vice versa chronic immune conditions can disrupt thyroid physiology.

Some of these include hepatitis C, Epstein Barr Virus, Lyme disease, inflammatory bowel conditions, and autoimmune diseases.

It is super important to support and restore the immune system back to normal activity in order to stop the progression of thyroid disease.

There are many other causes for thyroid dysfunction. Some of the most common causes include nutritional deficiencies, hormone imbalances often caused by birth control pills and HRT (hormone replacement therapy).

Other causes include environmental disruptors which can act as goitrogens. These are substances that interfere with thyroid physiology.

One nutrient that is important to the thyroid is iodine. Iodine is needed by the thyroid to make thyroid hormones. Environmental disruptors such as mercury, arsenic, nitrates, pesticides, etc. compete with iodine preventing the thyroid from making thyroid hormone leading to a hypothyroid.

One more cause of hypothyroidism that I'll briefly mention are medications. There are many medications that can disrupt thyroid physiology.

Some of the most common ones include anti-inflammatory meds, antibiotics, anti-depressants, diabetic drugs, high blood pressure meds, pain meds, antacids, and cholesterol lowering drugs.

Many of these drugs may not necessarily have a direct effect on TSH but they may effect the thyroid pathway upstream or downstream.

In functional medicine and functional nutrition I am always looking for the root cause of the disease. It's my job to find out where the dysfunction is taking place.
Once you find out where the problem is then you can put a plan in place to fix the problem, and start feeling better and regain your health.

“I am off all of my medication. 
 I have more energy than I have in years. 
 Dr. John helped me to reverse my Hashimoto’s Thyroid condition.”  
Janine Murray
Dr. John Heary is a board certified chiropractic physician with over 400 hours of post graduate training in clinical nutrition and functional medicine. He graduated from the prestigious New York Chiropractic College. He is Certified in Functional Medicine and Nutrition. He is also a Certified Clinician in Whole Food Nutrition.

His true passion is helping patients achieve their optimal health potential through proper nutrition, supplementation, and lifestyle changes. He specializes in comprehensive blood testing. Thousands of people all over the country have reached a more optimal state of health because of his unique approach to finding the underlying cause of health problems.
Active Lifestyle May Reduce Parkinson's Risk.

An analysis of three decades of data concerning nearly 100,000 women revealed that those who led the most active lifestyle had a 25% lower risk for Parkinson’s disease diagnosis than participants with a sedentary lifestyle.

Neurology, May 2023
Poor Sleep Linked to Worse Brain Health in Old Age.

Using data from the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936, researchers report that poor sleep is associated with faster loss of healthy white matter in the brain in the eighth decade of life.

Sleep Medicine, June 2023
Cancer Moonshot May Fall Short.

In 2016, the National Cancer Institute received funding to initiate the Cancer Moonshot, a program with the goal of cutting the cancer death rate by 50% in the next 25 years. While improvements in screening and treatment have led to an annual decline of 2.3% a year in recent years, the agency notes that the rate of decline will need to increase to 2.7% a year to meet the Cancer Moonshot goal.

Cancer Discovery, April 2023
Mediterranean Diet Improves Artery Flexibility.

According to a recent study, switching to the Mediterranean diet—an eating pattern focused on fruits, vegetables, nuts, fish, olive oil, and whole grains while avoiding red and processed meats, dairy, saturated fats, and refined sugars–can reduce proximal aortic stiffness by 4.8% within 18 months.

Journal of the American College of Cardiology, April 2023
Many Teens Have Considered Suicide.

A recent study found that 30% of high school students have seriously considered suicide, 23.6% have planned suicide, and 13.3% have attempted suicide. The authors of the study conclude, “School and community-based strategies include creating safe and supportive environments, promoting connectedness, teaching coping and problem solving, and gatekeeper training.”

Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, April 2023
STIs Continue to Increase in the United States.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that sexually transmitted infections (STIs) increased again in 2021— a total of 2.5 million cases in the year compared with 1.9 million in 2014—with the most notable increases in syphilis, gonorrhea, and chlamydia infections.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, April 2023
Many Kids Have Misused ADHD Medications.

New research suggests that as a higher percentage of students in a middle or high school is prescribed medication to manage attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), there is a corresponding increase in students who abuse such medications. In some schools, up to a quarter of students have taken ADHD medications that were prescribed to a peer. Health officials note that the misuse of such drugs can lead to side effects that include irregular heartbeat, dangerously high body temperature, seizures, and a greater risk for substance use disorder over time.

JAMA Network Open, April 2023
Sit Less, Move More, Live Longer.

Using data from the Attitude, Behavior, and Change cohort study, researchers report that middle-aged adults who maintain a healthy weight, minimize sedentary behaviors, and get regular exercise are about two-thirds less likely to die in the following 15 years than their overweight peers who seldom exercise and spend excessive amounts of time performing sedentary activities.

Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, May 2023
Modified Mediterranean Ketogenic Diet May Reduce Alzheimer's Risk.

Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is responsible for inhibiting the excitability of brain cells and balancing the neuronal activity required for healthy brain function. Past research has associated GABA dysfunction with neuropsychiatric conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. In a recent study, researchers observed that patients with mild-cognitive impairment experienced an increase in GABA-producing microbes in the gut after switching to a modified Mediterranean-ketogenic diet (low carb emphasizing healthy fats and proteins), which researchers suspect may lower the risk for progression to Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia.

Alzheimer's & Dementia, March 2023
Mediterranean Diet Benefits Eye Health.

The Mediterranean diet is an eating pattern focused on fruits, vegetables, nuts, fish, olive oil, and whole grains while avoiding red and processed meats, dairy, saturated fats, and refined sugars. The current research suggests that greater adherence to the Mediterranean diet is associated with slower progression of age-related macular degeneration and a reduced incidence of diabetic retinopathy.

Current Opinions in Ophthalmology, May 2023
Asthma and Eczema Increase Arthritis Risk.

Following a review of data concerning nearly 1.4 million adults, researchers report that individuals with either asthma or eczema are up to 58% more likely to develop osteoarthritis, and the risk is even greater for those with both conditions.

Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, March 2023
Irregular Sleep Associated with High Blood Pressure.

During the course of a nine-month study that included 12,287 adults, researchers observed that participants whose sleep duration varied by two or more hours from night to night were 85% more likely to have high blood pressure. The finding highlights the importance of maintaining a consistent sleep schedule.

American Heart Association, March 2023
Depression May Be Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease.

Among a group of 1,028 adults whom researchers monitored for more than five years, those with more severe anxiety and/or depressive symptoms were more likely to be diagnosed with cardiovascular disease, even after adjusting for traditional risk factors.

Journal of Affective Disorders, May 2023
Increasing Fiber Intake May Help Preserve Cognitive Function.

Past research has shown that carriers of the apolipoprotein E (ApoE) gene are at elevated risk for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease. In a recent study that included 1,139 older adults, researchers observed that participants with the ApoE gene who increased their fiber intake by 5 grams a day had a 30% lower risk for cognitive decline.

Age and Ageing, January 2023
Dangerous Fungal Infections on the Rise.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that drug-resistant Candida albicans infections have increased significantly since the first identified case in the United States in 2016 to 4,041 cases in 2021. While Candida albicans is not a danger to healthy people, infection is a threat to those who are very ill, patients with invasive medical devices, and those who have long or frequent hospital stays.

Annals of Internal Medicine, March 2023
Osteoporosis Linked to Macular Degeneration?

Osteoporosis is a condition characterized by low bone mineral density, which can increase the risk for fracture in the event of a fall. An analysis of data from the Taiwanese National Health Insurance system found that osteoporotic patients also have a 34% elevated risk for age-related macular degeneration. The findings suggest that patients under treatment for osteoporosis should be sure to attend regular vision screenings.

Osteoporosis International, April 2023
Foods to Avoid for Reducing Salt Intake.

The Institute for the Advancement of Food and Nutrition Sciences notes that the following foods may be most responsible for excessive sodium intake in the American diet: pizza; bread, rolls, and buns; cold cuts and cured meats; soups; burritos and tacos; savory snacks; poultry; cheese; pasta dishes; burgers; cookies, brownies, and cakes; bacon, frankfurters, and sausages; and chicken nuggets.

Nutrients, February 2023
Staying Active Can Slow Mental Decline.

Researchers analyzed long-term data from the Women's Health Initiative study and found that for about every half hour of moderate-to-vigorous activity a woman over age 65 averages per day, her risk for developing mild-cognitive impairment or dementia decreases by 21%.

Alzheimer's & Dementia, January 2023
Just 10 Minutes Longer for Improved Diet.

In a study that included 50 families, researchers observed that when mealtime was extended by ten minutes, children ate more servings of fruit and vegetables, and they felt more full and less likely to snack afterward.

JAMA Network Open, April 2023
Uterine Fibroid Symptoms.

While growths in a woman’s uterus called uterine fibroids usually aren’t cancerous, they can be a source of significant pain and discomfort. The Department of Health and Human Services notes the following are typical symptoms of uterine fibroids: heavy, painful periods; feelings of fullness in the lower abdomen/pelvic region; abdominal swelling; frequent urination; lower back pain; and reproductive issues.

Department of Health and Human Services, February 2023
Lifestyle Changes for Better Blood Pressure Management.

The Mayo Clinic offers the following natural recommendations for individuals to lower their blood pressure: lose weight, get regular exercise, reduce sodium intake, avoid excessive alcohol consumption, don’t smoke, learn to manage stress, get adequate sleep, monitor blood pressure at home, and let your family and friends know your goals so they can support your choices.

Mayo Clinic, February 2023
Dr. John Heary
Functional Nutrition & Integrative Health Center
266 Buffalo St.
Hamburg, NY 14075
(716) 545-4090
John Heary, DC, PC - Copyright 2019 - All Rights Reserved
Privacy Policy - Disclaimer - Terms of Service
Powered By ClickFunnels.com